Boneset Herb

2. White Boneset, july 27 03

Boneset is a native to the Ontario region, but is less common in the northern part of the province in Canada. Boneset grows together with the two species of gravel root or joe-pye, but Joe-pye grows in the south-western corner of the province. Both plants grow in wetlands, riverbanks, marshes and lakes, and prefer open sunny areas. Joe-pye root and boneset herb are both wetland plants that boost the immune system.

2. White Boneset, July 27 2003Boneset is easy to identify because of the joined leaves around the stem that grow in paired opposites. In this picture of white boneset, the white flowers are just about to bloom, and it is the best time to pick it.

It is best known for treating fevers and in Traditional Chinese Medicine, it treats all three stages of fever, Tai Yang, Shao Yang, Yang Ming. It is called boneset not because it knits and repairs bones like comfrey, but because it is used for deep, aching bone pain, like rheumatic typhoid and “bone breaking fever.” It is extremely bitter, cooling and drying while stimulating the liver and digestion. Caution is advised! This plant is becoming increasingly endangered due to destruction of wetland habitat and over harvesting.

Common Name  Boneset herb
Latin Name  Eupatorium perfoliatum
Family Asteraceae (Aster)
Parts Used Perennial- leaves and flowers
Target Organs immune, circulatory, digestive, respiratory, liver, stomach, throat
Common Uses Immune respiratory: stimulates immunity against infections. Used for fevers, dengue, malaria, colds, coughs, flu, infections, catarrh, sore throat, toxicity, Digestion: liver congestion, constipation, upset stomach, indigestion, gas, bloating Nervous system: debility, pain, neuralgia,
Properties Anticatarrhal, anti-inflammatory(local, systemic) anti-infective, antimicrobial, antineoplastic, antirheumatic, aperient, appetite stimulant, astringent, bitter,  cholagogue, choleretic, digestive stimulant, diaphoretic, diuretic, immune stimulant, febrifuge, nervine, relaxant, stomachic, tranquilizer, peripheral vasodilator, vulnerary
Constituents polysaccharides, flavonoids: quercetin, rutin, astragalin, hyperoside, inulin, sterols, vitamin D1, galic acid, essential volatile oil, glucosidal tannin, tannic acid, diterpenes, bitter glycoside: eupatorin, sesquiterpenes lactones, fatty resin,
Cautions Medium strength: Only use dried herb. Avoid high doses long term use. May cause diarrhoea, vomiting in high doses. Low doses short term use for acute infections. Should not be used by pregnant, nursing women, infants and children under the age of ten. Use in formulation up to 25% for no more than 1 week or two. 
Dosage Tincture: 1-3ml                Dried herb Tea infusion: 3-8g cold infusion for exhaustion and acute fever
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