Archive for November, 2013

November 12, 2013

The History of the Pinecone as a Symbol

The humble pinecone has always been a
powerful symbol of regeneration, nourishment 
and
enlightenment. Some of the earliest records are from
Ancient Sumerian palace carvings that date back to 713-716 BC which
depict winged gods holding pinecones and using them to pollinate
the tree of life. What other mysteries do they hold?

Sumerian god Marduk/ Dionysus

Sumerian god / Dionysus

Dionysus, the Greek god of winemaking
and ecstasy, later known as ‘Bacchus’ to the Romans was known to
carry a staff topped with a pinecone called a ‘Thyrsus.’ The
pinecone is also found on the Egyptian staff of Osiris,
which
depicts two intertwining serpents, like kundalini rising or like the caduceus symbol of medicine in the West.

Egyptian Staff-of-Osiris Egyptian museum Turino Italy 1224 BC

Egyptian Staff-of-Osiris Egyptian museum Turino Italy 1224 BC

In India in Hindu tradition
Kundalini energy shows two spiralling snakes
wrapping around the seven chakras rising up along the spine into
wings, which represents the path to enlightenment. Chakras are an
energy system, and the snakes that encase the chakras represent
another energy system, kundalini but also associated with the infinity symbol. The
infinity symbol is the prototype for DNA and means infinite life.
In Celtic tradition it’s represented in the ancient weave
carvings of the infinity symbol.

Learn more about the infinity symbol-

http://earthelixir.ca/2012/10/10/infinity-symbol/

A statue of the Mexican god
‘Chicomecoatl’ which means seven snakes, has a pinecone in one hand
and an evergreen tree in the other.Mexican god

There is also a pinecone on the
Pope’s staff, and the largest pinecone in the world is a
bronze sculpture located in Vatican Square in the
Courtyard of the Pinecone.

Pigna in Pinecone Courtyard, Vatican

Pigna in Pinecone Courtyard, Vatican

Legend has it that Romans built an
enormous bronze pinecone they called ‘Pigna’ which stood on
top of the Pantheon and acted as a lid for the round opening in the
centre of the buildings vault. It is confirmed the
pinecone was part of an overflowing fountain next to the
temple of Isis. Pinecone symbols adorn candle holders and
lamps in the Church as a symbol for the source of illumination.
Pinecones are found in Freemason art and sculptures. Pinecones
appear on the ceilings of Masonic temples and lodges, and in
architecture like the one on display in the Financial District in
New York on the side of the Whitehall building, which depicts two
spiralling serpents rising to meet a pinecone overlooking Battery
Place.

Masonic-Pine-Cone-Caduceus whitehall nyMasonic sculpture Caduceus
with pinecone, Whitehall NY

DIY Pinecone Ornaments http://earthelixir.ca/2011/12/09/diy-aromatherapy-pinecone-ornaments/

Pinecones resemble the structure of
the pineal gland aka epithalamus, which is located in the
centre of our brain and is an unpaired structure. It
is isolated from the blood brain barrier while it receives a large
percentage of blood flow. The pineal gland which is
pronounced (‘pine’ eel) has been referred to as the seat
of the soul and the ‘third eye.’ The pineal gland has rods and
cones just like our seeing eyes do which could be the reason it is
called the ‘third eye.’ It is responsible for melatonin
production and governs our circadian rhythms, which regulates light
perception to regulate our light awake and dark sleep periods.
The pineal gland has always been a mystery and little has been said
about it in anatomy physiology books until recently. The tree of
life could represent the
arbor vitae’ which literally translates
as
the tree of life, in the cerebellum. It consists of bands of white
matter that forms a tree like appearance when it is cut in section.
The cerebellum is responsible for muscle activity in response from
higher centers.

November 8, 2013

Autumn, the Chinese Five Elements and Essential oils that Help Grief

The Chinese Five Elements in Traditional Chinese Medicine relates to the rhythms of nature and reflects natural cycles. Seasons, elements, colours, sounds, organs, glands and emotions fall into five categories. It is the basis of all natural health practices and many medical, philosophical and artistic themes fit in to it.

The autumn season in the five elements is related to the metal element, because of its enduring qualities.

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The constructive emotion for the rhythm of autumn is being reflective and pondering the past, which is necessary for learning lessons and figuring things out.
The destructive emotion of autumn is overbearing grief and sadness.
The sound that relieves the stress of grief and sadness is crying.
Being reflective for too long in the past will lead to grief and sadness.
The trees in autumn change brilliant colours before shedding their leaves, like a parade of tears that fall celebrating what once was.

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“There is a sacredness in tears. They are not a mark of weakness, but of power. They speak more eloquently than ten thousand tongues. They are the messengers of overwhelming grief, of deep contrition, and of unspeakable love.”~Washington Irving

Crying flushes unhealthy bacteria out of the body and strengthens the immune system while relieving stress. It is healthier to embrace the motion of emotions. To be moved profoundly and to feel the depths of our own well is to be quenched.

It is a natural process to mourn for lost loved ones, it is a measurement of love. It reminds us what really matters, and what is important to us. There is no right way or wrong way to grieve, but being reflective too long on the past and pining away upsets a balanced life. It is stress relieving to grieve, but when it interferes with life it becomes destructive. Grief may never go away and that is understandable, but it must not become an unhealthy attachment to death. The cycle must not get stuck and be crippling. Learn to flow with the tides.

To manage grief one must look at the bigger picture beyond the cycle of rebirth and death, and an acceptance mixed with a deeper understanding must be reached. Find gratitude and a sense of meaning by embracing the whole picture. One must rise and fall with the cycle of seasons, especially upon completion.
Bringing yourself back into the present moment helps to overcome grief, but only after it has been sifted through and cherished. Being sad upon reflection provides an honest look at ourselves and others. A kind understanding is helpful to gain insights in order to grow.

Be reflective without falling in to a perpetual grief pattern by learning to accept change. Let go of the past that does not serve you any purpose anymore. Live in the present moment and savour all the aspects of life. Learn to adapt to change and harness the hard lessons of letting go. Use wisdom to filter the good and bad, learn from it, make peace and move on. Dealing with death and the little deaths that happen ironically reminds us to appreciate life.

The organs systems that are impacted are the lungs and large intestine, which is part of the respiratory and digestive system.
Remember to breathe deep and eat healthy during tough times.

Essential oils to help alleviate grief:
Good partner combinations
basil and bergamot, frankincense and neroli, marjoram and lavender, eucalyptus and mandarin

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